20 Year Software: Engineering and Updates

  • A Dead Software Foundation, dedicated to maintaining the software which underlies IoT devices for twenty years. This is not only the Linux kernel, but things like tinybox and openssl. Such a foundation could be funded by organizations shipping IoT devices, or even by governments, concerned about the externalities, what Sean Smith called “the Cyber Love Canal” in The Internet of Risky Things. The Love Canal analogy is apt; in theory, the government cleans up after the firms that polluted are gone. (The practice is far more complex.)
  • Model architectures that show how to engineer devices, such as an internet speaker, so that it can effectively be taken offline when the time comes. (There’s work in the mobile app space on making apps work offline, which is related, but carries the expectation that the app will eventually reconnect.)
  • Conceptualization of the legal limits of what you can sign away in the fine print. (This may be everything; between severability and arbitration clauses, the courts have let contract law tilt very far towards the contract authors, but Congress did step in to write the Consumer Review Fairness Act.) The FTC has commented on issues of device longevity, but not (afaik) on limits of contracts.

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Adam Shostack

Adam Shostack

Generally blogging at adam.shostack.org/blog, but shared posts here before Medium asked me to jump through more and more hoops..